Too Much of a Good Thing

Bob Bevington
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Too Much of a Good Thing | October 25th, 2012

Too Much of a Good Thing

I’m sick of football. Shocking, isn’t it? But let me explain.

Ever since high school graduation, I’ve followed one team: The Buckeyes of THE Ohio State University. If that were the still the case I’d be holding back a grin all the live-long day. But . . .

Enter my ten-year-old son, Michael, quarterback for his 4th grade youth football team. He wakes up, rubs his eyes, and checks three football websites before breakfast. He wins daily Super Bowls on Xbox Madden-13 and makes shrewd trades for his fantasy team. He commandeers the remote and it’s Sports Center and Sports Nation and The B1G Ten Network. On Sunday afternoons there are six NFL games on the screen at the same time—and he’s watching them all simultaneously. I don’t think this kid has ever seen a cartoon.

Anyway, back in July when the football pre-season workouts began, I volunteered to be an assistant coach for Michael’s team. These guys take their football seriously. We’ve had practices or games every day of every week except for Sundays and a few Fridays. I’m not complaining. I love the kids, the coaches, and being out on the field blowing my whistle. But between the Madden, NFL Sunday ticket, youth football, and of course, my beloved Buckeyes, all the highlight plays have started to look the same.

It’s too much of a good thing. And I’m getting a little bit bored with it. But it got me thinking . . .

There’s one good thing I will never get tired of. One thing I can never get enough of. It’s the story of the unique and most amazing Person—fully God and fully man—who emptied Himself so that I might become full. The story climaxes on a bloody cross where He was slain so that I might live. And why? It’s because of the real, lasting, indomitable love and justice of the Triune God.

If, like me, your connection with the fallen human race is painfully evident, and your desperate need for THE Savior is obvious, the idea of getting too much of THE cross will never cross your mind.

On the sidelines and on the field our cheer of deepest gratitude, “Worthy is the Lamb who was slain” will last longer than the live-long day. Longer then all the seasons, all the trophies and rings and medals.

Don’t settle for anything less. If you do, you’ll eventually get sick and tired of it and say, “Enough!”

PS:   Just now I asked Michael if he was getting a little bit bored with all the football stuff. He looked at me like I was out of my mind, and quietly replied, “Not really.” Oh well. Go Buckeyes.

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  • thecommonlanguage.com

    Hi Bob,
    I love this blog, though I understand that wanting too much of a good worldy thing may reveal idolatry.
    When I read, “Enter my ten year old son, Michael, quarterback for his 4th grade youth football team,” I was immediately taken back to when I was 10. When I was ten I was running for my life and hiding from my enemies: When I was ten I had my first flashback of what was finally diagnosed, 20 years later, as Post-traumatic stress disorder.
    I count it pure blessing that Michael can enjoy being in community, and perhaps that enjoyment is best expressed through his passion for football, a team sport. Perhaps our loving God is honing his leadership skills through being a quarterback. Perhaps He is developing Michael’s character by developing in Michael a patience for the dumb mistakes he and his teammates sometimes make, and a perseverance to try again and not give up. Perhaps He is teaching him not to be afraid in adversity, and to stand firm in his faith. Perhaps He’s laying the groundwork for Michael to see that being part of a team is like being part of a body. Afterall, there is no randomness in God’s creation.
    The seed that goes out from His mouth never returns to Him empty, but will accomplish what He desires and achieve the purpose for which He sent it. (Isaiah 55:10-11)
    Thanks, Bob.
    Susan

    • http://BobBevington.com/ Bob Bevington

      Thanks for your kind thoughts. I pray all your “perhaps” are true about my son!

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