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Krin Baer
Full Name: Krin Baer
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Email Address: kkbaer@gmail.com
Krin is restless in the world, and thinks Augustine was right. He grew up amongst the cornfields of Indiana and met Jesus when “stuff” started to not make sense at age 17. He graduated from Purdue University (boiler up!) in 2010 with a degree in Business Management. After university, he traveled the world with renowned Christian apologist, Ravi Zacharias, for two years and learned a bit more about God and humanity. Now his journey has taken him to Oxford, England where he is studying theology and apologetics. Krin would probably be depressed without music. He loves traveling, cultures that challenge your assumptions, and learning other languages. Currently, his time is spent trying to be smarter than he is, practicing being a rock star, and learning about truth and community.

About Krin Baer

Krin is restless in the world, and thinks Augustine was right. He grew up amongst the cornfields of Indiana and met Jesus when “stuff” started to not make sense at age 17. He graduated from Purdue University (boiler up!) in 2010 with a degree in Business Management.

After university, he traveled the world with renowned Christian apologist, Ravi Zacharias, for two years and learned a bit more about God and humanity. Now his journey has taken him to Oxford, England where he is studying theology and apologetics.

Krin would probably be depressed without music. He loves traveling, cultures that challenge your assumptions, and learning other languages. Currently, his time is spent trying to be smarter than he is, practicing being a rock star, and learning about truth and community.

I’m Unemployed

Krin Baer
Written By:
I’m Unemployed | October 7th, 2013

I’m Unemployed

KrinI’m unemployed.  Yes, that dirty, degrading word has found its way into my life and erected a “vacancy” sign for the entire world to see.  After spending a year of graduate study in England, I packed my bags and headed to the American south to find a job and declare my unashamed love for a certain young lady.

As a part of this transition, unexpected questions began to arise.  After several months without a job and a dwindling savings account, what was I going to do?  What does it mean that I can’t currently provide for a family?  Why do I feel like an enormous failure each time I am rejected by a potential employer?  Is my life worth anything anymore?

After talking with several people far wiser than me, I started to wonder: how does what I believe about God effect what I know about myself in this time of uncertainty?

The Bible says a lot about belief.  The references one could mount with the word would number too many for a simple blog post.  But is the belief that was communicated in the early church the same kind of belief that is communicated now?  Sometimes I think that religious belief becomes a merely intellectual exercise, limited to a knowledge test of history and theology.

But think for a moment.  Belief in my everyday life can fit into roughly two spheres.  First, belief about a fact that begs little trust of the believer: example, I believe that you were born in Sydney, Australia.  This doesn’t change my life.  It may be true, but has little bearing on my existence.  Then there is the second kind.  This kind of belief fundamentally changes who you are.  Do you believe that your husband/wife loves you?

These beliefs change who we are.  I will live my life differently believing that my girlfriend loves me.  I will relocate from across the Pond and face unemployment. And I will give to her, spend quality time with her, and make sacrifices for her happiness.

This is the kind of belief that [Read more...]

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Living In the Tension of Truth

Krin Baer
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Living In the Tension of Truth | September 11th, 2013

Living In the Tension of Truth

Krin #6 ImageAdmit it, we are all “identity maniacs.”  Whether consciously or subconsciously, we are constantly asking questions about we  relate to the world around us.  How many different ways can we ask the questions, “who am I?” or “why am I here?”

One of the ways we ask and answer those questions is in what we own and consume.  Right now, I’m sipping on designer coffee, typing on a Mac, and wearing a shirt shamelessly brandishing my allegiance to a certain academic institution. These things help define who I am.  Yes, I love coffee, and Macs, and knowing (thinking) that my alma mater is better than yours. If you told me I couldn’t drink coffee anymore, I would rebel.  Ask me to stop using my iPhone?  Get away from me.  If I’m honest, taking away any of these things will make me scream injustice at the sky.  No God, not my Mac! It’s part of “me.”

This is where the “good” Christian will jump in and triumphantly say, “No, Krin, your identity is in Jesus!” Granted, fellow follower, but hold on.  [Read more...]

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Freedom

Krin Baer
Written By:
Freedom | July 4th, 2013

Freedom

Freedom ImageLike many young Americans, I value my freedom. The thought of being able to go anywhere and do anything at any time fills me with excitement and anticipation. Are you going on a road trip? I’ll join. Need an extra hand while you’re in Argentina? I can help. Want to spend three months in India and see what happens? Yes, many times over.

This drive to see and experience the world is not inherently wrong, but it can quickly become an idol. Watch out for the god of open options!

My friends in college always used to complain, “Krin, you can’t commit to anything—not even the simplest things in life!” Those who knew me best would never let me get away with saying the word maybe yet it remained my all-time favorite word. This word didn’t cause much trouble when I was invited to parties, but it became the root of much pain when it came to close friendships and romantic relationships.

Eventually I had to admit it—I was worshipping a god of open options. From the cereal aisle to the person I loved the most, I struggled to say yes to anyone or anything, because it meant saying no to the rest.

Several months ago, I read an article in Christianity Today called Imprisoned by Choice. It is a poignant piece, describing this subtle idol that exists in the minds and hearts of many young people. Here’s the key line:

The god of open options is also a liar. He promises you that by keeping your options open, you can have everything and everyone. But in the end, you get nothing and no one.[1]

It hit me between the eyes. Freedom from something [Read more...]

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Come On My Soul

Krin Baer
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Come On My Soul | May 22nd, 2013

Come On My Soul

CampfireHave you ever spoken to your soul? Yes, I know it seems a bit strange at first, but lets think about this for a second.

From the moment God created us, we know that we have been more than just mere physical beings. We have longings, cravings, and innate intuitions that point to something outside of us. Rather, these things point to someone. That someone is God, and he created you to be a worshipper.

Yet, we all know that there are times that we don’t want to worship God. We drag our tired, broken bodies into the world, say the right words and sing the right songs, but our souls are cast down. Our internal fight condemns us, and turns us into walking contradictions of depression and anxiety.

This is where the speaking to the soul comes in. Martyn Lloyd-Jones expounds on this idea:

Have you realized that most of your unhappiness in life is due to the fact that you are listening to yourself instead of talking to yourself? Take those thoughts that come to you the moment you wake up in the morning. You have not originated them but they are talking to you, they bring back the problems of yesterday, etc. Somebody is talking. Who is talking to you? Your self is talking to you. Now this man’s treatment [in Psalm 42] was this: instead of allowing this self to talk to him, he starts talking to himself. “Why art thou cast down, O my soul?” he asks. His soul had been depressing him, crushing him. So he stands up and says, “Self, listen for moment, I will speak to you.”

Rend Collective, a joyful band of Irish men and women, recently released an album called Campfire. The record starts off with a song called Come On in which the band continually tells the soul where it is to look now.

Come on, my soul! Let down the walls! [Read more...]

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There Are No Stupid Questions

Krin Baer
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There Are No Stupid Questions | April 24th, 2013

There Are No Stupid Questions

Stupid QuestionsReally? Is it possible this statement has its roots in someone’s quick attempt to justify what they’ve already recognized to be a question that is less than helpful or valuable?

If we’re honest, I think we can concur that questions of this sort do exist. And in fact our thoughts and words are filled with queries devoid of any real substance and lacking in any helpful deduction.

Some examples include:

Can God create a rock too heavy for him to lift?
How many angels can dance on the head of a pin?

Jesus recognized some questions can be fraught with misguided assumptions and faulty conclusions that distract from the ultimate truth that we are trying to discover. It is interesting to see how he fielded them.

In chapter ten of Luke’s biography of Jesus, a lawyer comes to ask Jesus a very good question, What shall I do to inherit eternal life? In typical Jesus fashion, he answers with another question about how the lawyer interprets the law. The lawyer answers correctly with the greatest commandment given to man:

You shall love the Lord your God with all your heart and with all your soul and with all your strength and with all your mind, and your neighbor as yourself.

But then in verse 29 the lawyer goes on to ask what might be considered a stupid question: [Read more...]

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Think You Know The Gospel?

Krin Baer
Written By:
Think You Know The Gospel? | March 14th, 2013

Think You Know The Gospel?

C.S. LewisRecently I was on mission to an English university. Throughout the week we filled the campus with great zeal to share the gospel with any and every person we encountered. We stood in the freezing rain handing out flyers. We engaged students in dialogue after evangelistic talks. And we asked people to take a survey that would map their worldview.

One of my favorite questions to ask students was, What do you think the message of Christianity is?  I was surprised at the range of answers I received. However, even more surprising were the people who claimed to be Christians yet could not state or explain the good news.

I remember very clearly hearing John Piper say that we never, never, never outgrow our need for the gospel. No doubt Piper is correct. But how can we continually reflect on the good news and remind ourselves of its majesty and beauty if we can’t even articulate it?

I met several people on the campus that day who told me, It doesn’t matter which God you believe in, as long as it brings peace to your life. Really?

C.S. Lewis wrote two sentences to put that idea to bed: [Read more...]

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Introductions and Assumptions

Krin Baer
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Introductions and Assumptions | February 5th, 2013

Introductions and Assumptions

Pilate and JesusLife is filled with introductions. Our first was most likely a violent and uncomfortable introduction to the reality of life. From that day, we’ve experienced countless introductions to new places, ideas, and people. Each year at Christmas we are reminded of the world’s introduction to the long expected Messiah. And, today, no doubt, you will be introduced to someone or something new.

Whether we realize it or not, introductions are fraught with assumptions. When we meet new people, we generally have some supposition about who they are and what they do.

But is that wise? Is it possible that we are limiting ourselves in discovering the truth about God, the human experience, and the world around us because of the presumptions we make in regards to each new beginning?

I remember meeting a farmer at a market in the small town of Wichita Falls, Texas. At the time, I held a job that caused me to travel for over half the year and experience many different cultures. I was unhealthily proud of the fact that I had left the small town of my youth and explored the world. In approaching the farmer, I assumed he had probably never left Texas, possibly not even his city. Yet, soon after being introduced to him I realized I was terribly wrong. In fact, he had left Texas and was well acquainted with parts of the world I had never visited. In my pride and judgment, I had cast a stereotype [Read more...]

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