Michael Boling Reviews Red Like Blood

Bob Bevington
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Michael Boling Reviews Red Like Blood | October 11th, 2013

Michael Boling Reviews Red Like Blood

“. . . if there is someone you know who needs to desperately hear about God’s free gift of grace, this book is definitely one to pick up, read, and share with those in need.”

That’s what book reviewer, Michael Boling, recently wrote about Red Like Blood in his blog, Intelmin Apologetics. I recently learned that over the past 2-3 months twenty different bloggers have reviewed Red Like Blood. Since you’re on the RLB blog I thought you might like to hear what people are still saying about the RLB book. Here’s the whole article:

red_like_blood_210wide_300dpiThe grace of God is far too often just a theological concept that in many cases is overlooked or taken for granted. Unless someone has experienced a tremendous low point in their life, the proverbial rock bottom if you will, the wonderment of God’s grace is just a term the preacher throws around for good measure on Sunday morning. Joe Coffey and Bob Bevington, in their book Red Like Blood: Confrontations with Grace, provide the reader an upfront and extremely personal look at what God’s grace looks like by allowing the reader to take a journey through their respective lives, noting along the way how God mercifully reached down and lifted them up in their time of need.

Unlike books that take a theological look at the topic of grace, Red Like Blood is extremely practical. The reader is able through the lens of the co-authors Coffey and Bevington, to truly observe how this thing called grace works and what it looks like in the life of individuals who so desperately need it. The authors are extremely frank as they share their respective life stories so the reader should be prepared for some phrases and statements that are definitely not for the faint of heart or for younger eyes to read or hear. The content at times was a bit “mature” but rightfully so given the experiences of these authors and the necessity for the reader to fully grasp that no matter how far someone has fallen, God is there to pick them up. By not beating around the proverbial bush, the authors are brutally honest about their path and confrontation with God’s grace in their life.

I especially appreciated the format of this book. It was a relatively quick read even at right over 200 pages. The back and forth conversational style of writing made me feel as if I was sitting in the room actually listening to these two men share their life story with me. That engaging and personal approach once again sets this book apart from the more theological style texts on grace, affording the reader to feel as if they know the writers personally. Furthermore, I felt while reading this book a great connection to Coffey and Bevington as I was drawn in to their stories and the passionate telling of how God had moved in their lives.

All throughout this book, helpful tidbits of great scriptural truth are interspersed through the story telling, [Read more...]

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Blessed Comma, Part Two

Bob Bevington
Written By:
Blessed Comma, Part Two | February 26th, 2013

Blessed Comma, Part Two

 

Tiny But Huge!

Tiny But Huge!

For all have sinned and fall short of the glory of God,

There’s a mega-blessed comma hanging from the right side of God. Among other things it means the next three sentences must be read S-L-O-W-L-Y.

Don’t worry if you are baffled by them. If you’re not, you’re reading too fast. These words perplex mind and heart for a good reason—the meaning of the entire message of the Bible is packed into them. They reveal the solution to the dilemma we all face as sinners who have disregarded and disdained the glory of God. We are . . .

. . . justified by his grace as a gift, through the redemption that is in Christ Jesus, whom God put forward as a propitiation by his blood, to be received by faith. This was to show God’s righteousness, because in his divine forbearance he had passed over former sins. It was to show his righteousness at the present time, so that he might be just and the justifier of the one who has faith in Jesus. (Romans 3:24-26 ESV)

I sat and stared at those sentences. Questions came. And then answers. Before I knew it something better than gold started falling out in chunks. Take enough time and it will happen for you too: [Read more...]

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Guest Blogger: Laurie Coombs

Bob Bevington
Written By:
Guest Blogger: Laurie Coombs | October 18th, 2012

Guest Blogger: Laurie Coombs

Laurie Coombs

If someone you love was murdered, maybe you can imagine what it’s like to be Laurie Coombs.

And if the convicted murderer wrote to you from prison trying to justify his actions, maybe you can relate to the angst that raged as she wrestled to reply.

But even if you’ve never encountered a situation like this one, you should still read Laurie’s guest post. Because you never know when you might be called on to forgive the unforgivable.

 

FREEDOM THROUGH GRACE, by Laurie Coombs

“He’s doing it again,” I told my friend, Sarah, “listen to this!” I read the letter I received that afternoon from Anthony, the man who murdered my dad. ”Why won’t he simply say ‘I did it. It was my fault.’ Period. He’s still trying to justify his actions! He committed murder! He killed my dad! There’s no justification for that!”

After talking it though, I sat down and began to type my response, adrenaline pumping through my veins. I wanted to set him straight. He claims to be a Christian now. Why isn’t he repentant? Why does he keep blame shifting? The words poured forth like floodwaters out of my heart, addressing each of the issues and backing them with Scripture. “Oh, this is good,” I thought. But I knew. This was not the response God wanted. I prayed, as I awaited direction from Jesus. Days passed and turned to weeks, and finally, the answer came.

Grace.

It was true. Anthony was far from where I wanted him to be. But, it was at this moment I felt Jesus speak to my soul. Leave Anthony to me. Now forgive. And honestly, the crazy thing is that I was given the grace to forgive. In this moment. In the midst of my anger. I sat down to revise my letter to Anthony, and at the end of it, I wrote, “…despite the fact that we will probably never see eye to eye in all areas, I do forgive you…. I hope this finds you well, and I pray that God heals you from your past as He is doing for me. I pray that you learn to live your life for God wherever He has you and that you’re able to find peace in this life.”

I was set free. I was free of the anger, the bitterness, and the pain that held me captive for over a decade.

What’s more is that after I extended grace, I witnessed a transformation that was almost palpable in Anthony, as Jesus brought him to a place of repentance and healing. We serve an amazing God. A God who gives us grace to do the impossible. A God who redeems.

I was called to forgive. To love my enemy. To surrender to Jesus the pain and bitterness which took residence in the deepest recess of my soul. Out of this––following Jesus into my unknown, scary places––I witnessed the redemption and grace of our mighty God.

We serve an amazing God. A God who gives us grace to do the impossible, and I encourage you today to place Christ at the center of your most broken relationship and extend the grace that was freely given to you.

“…while we were still sinners, Christ died for us.” – Romans 5:8

_______

Laurie Coombs is a writer who encourages others to draw closer to the heart of Jesus. She lives in Reno, Nevada with her husband, Travis. They have two little girls and are in the process of adopting one or two more children from Ethiopia. Be sure to visit Laurie on her Blog, LaurieCoombs.org, and on Twitter and Facebook.

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